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Your Asthma Control is Our Mission

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes.

* Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose.

* In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled deep into the breathing tubes twice daily.

* A new class of drugs has been developed to control inflammation: they are called biologics and are injected weekly or monthly into the skin of your abdomen.

 

Although there are a number of medications used for asthma control, the most common type is an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS).

This type of steroid does not make big muscles or affect sexual function.

Controllers work to tamp down inflammation in your airways.

These medications are either liquids that are sprayed from a pressurized canister into the airway or they are delivered as dry powder, inhaled using a specialized canister.

They work by landing on the surface of your airways, seeping into the cells, and suppressing the run-away inflammation.

There are several chemical compounds that are used including:

  • fluticasone,
  • beclomethasone,
  • mometasone,
  • flunisolide,
  • ciclesonide, and
  • budesonide.

Each comes in several strengths and each is administered every day to keep a lid on the ongoing inflammation.

When we have the dose right, you will not need your rescue inhaler more than once a month!

Controller medications: Another component of the excellent asthma control from Asthmaniac!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

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Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

 

In order for asthma medication to reach the lining of your breathing tubes, it must be suspended in the air you inhale.  

Most asthma medication is manufactured in liquid form.  It is contained in a pressurized canister called a Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI).  

When this canister is triggered, it converts the medication to an aerosol mist.  

This mist is inhaled by you to carry the medicine to the lining of your breathing tubes.

For years, you may have been holding your MDI up to your lips while inhaling, believing the medicine is actually getting into your lungs.  

Unfortunately, most of the medicine lands on the walls of your mouth, throat and tongue.  It cannot help your breathing if it does not get deeper into your breathing tubes.

There is an inexpensive and effective solution to this problem.

It is called a spacer.

A spacer is a tubular chamber that plugs onto the MDI.  

On one end it has a mouthpiece or mask, with a built-in valve. 

When you trigger the MDI, the spacer holds your medicine suspended as a cloud. 

This cloud hangs in the spacer chamber until you inhale from the mouthpiece end.  

Because the medicine is suspended, it flows with the air you inhale down into your lungs where we really need to get it. 

The valve keeps the “cloud” of medicine in the chamber, permitting it to go ONLY one way, down into your lungs.

Quite often, patients ask if they can use a nebulizer to deliver their asthma medication.  

Once they were miniaturized in the 1970’s, nebulizers became quite popular as a way to administer asthma medicine.  

They do have many limitations though.  

The biggest problem is that they don’t fit in your pocket.  

That means when you need your medication, but don’t have a nebulizer, you’ll be in trouble.

Most nebulizers depend on AC or battery power which may not be available to you when you feel your asthma kicking in.  

They also require tubing to transmit compressed air to the medicine chamber.  

And, there are many parts to keep track of and clean.

In comparison, the spacer is simple, portable, and easily replaced if you lose it.

And, most importantly, research conducted in the past 5 years shows that the amount of medicine reaching your lungs and breathing tubes is higher when you use a spacer than with a nebulizer.

My asthma patients depend on their spacers.

Where do you get one?

I order the pharmacy to provide a spacer for each of my patients using an MDI medication.

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

 

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Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Children and Asthma: Different from Adult Asthma?

Children and Asthma: Different from Adult Asthma?

Children and Asthma: Different from Adult Asthma?

* Asthma is present in about 10% of children.

* Asthma in children is diagnosed when your child has recurring episodes of wheezing that are relieved by rescue medicine such as albuterol

* Asthma in children is treated with the same medicines and treatment plans as in adults with adjustments for their size and metabolism.

 

Children have a lot more wheezing than adults.

A simple upper respiratory infection or common cold causes many children to wheeze.

But, a single episode of wheezing while ill doesn’t mean a child has asthma.  A key feature of asthma is the recurrence of wheezing, along with its reversibility by a bronchodilator/inhaler like albuterol.

How many children who wheeze when sick go on to have recurrent wheezing and asthma?  We don’t know for sure.  But we do know that infection with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) early in childhood is associated with the appearance of asthma.

The bottom line: asthma in children is a very big problem.

In 2016, about 6 million children were diagnosed with asthma.  That makes it  the most common chronic disease of childhood.

Untreated, asthma in children threatens them with death, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and school absenteeism.

Childhood asthma is treated with the same medications and strategies as in adults. Since they are kids there are adjustments in medication dosage, and some differences in severity classification.

Unfortunately, like adults, children are often not treated according to the National standard of care.

Asthmaniac is designed to serve them as well.

At Asthmaniac, pediatric expertise is always on-deck to make sure our approach to children with asthma is aligned with National standards.

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare 
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

 

Subscribe

to get Asthma Updates!

Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Asthma and COVID19: Breathing Easy during a Pandemic

Asthma and COVID19: Breathing Easy during a Pandemic

Asthma and COVID19: Breathing Easy during a Pandemic

* Asthma is a chronic disease that places you at higher risk of serious illness with COVID19 infection.

* Keeping your asthma well controlled will give you the best protection against serious COVID19 illness.

* Controlling your COVID19 exposure should be a high priority until we have a vaccine.

Does Asthma make you more vulnerable to COVID19?

Patients with chronic disease including chronic lung disease are having much more trouble with COVID19.

Many are dying when they become infected.

To be sure, having advanced age and asthma is a very concerning combination, but even young people with asthma should be concerned.

This is the time to get serious about asthma!

Your best defense is a strong offense.

Compared to the lungs of a person without asthma, your asthma lungs experience inflammation much more easily.

This tendency toward inflammation can be controlled by inhaled steroids and in some cases, new immune modulators.

Keeping a lid on this baseline inflammation should be our top priority all the time but especially during this COVID19 pandemic.

How does the COVID19 virus interact with your asthma lungs?

When it enters your body, the COVID19 virus attaches to the lining in the back of your throat.

From there, it moves to the airways of your lungs (bronchi and bronchioles). 

Once there, virus particles attach to and hijack the manufacturing processes of airway cells.  The result is that these cells pump out a continuous stream of virus particles.

When your immune system spots airway cells that have been taken over by the virus, it attacks them with a vengeance!  The result is inflammation.  

If your airways are already experiencing out-of-control inflammation, this is a disaster!

The addition of virus invasion and immune attack blows holes in tiny blood vessels, causing the lungs to fill with blood.   Airflow is blocked and then you have a life-threatening inability to breathe.

The amount of virus matters.

The more virus particles that get into your mouth, nose or eyes, the more likely you will develop a severe infection with a dangerous inflammatory reaction.

Look, it is virtually impossible for every person on the planet to completely avoid COVID19.

But, getting the smallest amount of exposure at any time should be your goal.

Washing your hands is a basic and effective way reduced the amount of virus you are handling.  Here’s how to wash!

Since virus are carried the the air, it is smart to keep a distance from people who might be carrying virus.  This includes people that aren’t having fever or cough at all!

And,

Mask UP!

Wear a face covering.

I know, this is so hard to get your mind around – like, for how long are we gonna have to do this?

Nobody can say just yet.

We just have to focus on each day, doing everything we can to keep those lungs in good working condition.

Down the road, we can hang up these designer masks, and go to crowded concerts, and, well, get back to ‘normal’.

In the mean time, let’s keep asthma under control!

Complete the subscription form on the left if you’d like to get an email when I post a new podcast and blog entry.

Thanks for learning more about asthma!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

Subscribe

to get Asthma Updates!

Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: How We Measure and Why?

Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: How We Measure and Why?

Peak Expiratory Flow Rate: How We Measure and Why?

* Peak Expiratory Flow is measured by you, several times a week using a small pocket-sized flowmeter

* You record the number measured by this devise.

* This number shows how well you are able to exhale and tells me if we have your lung inflammation under control

* When this number starts edging down over a few days, we know its time to take action before you start to feel symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath or actual wheezing.

* I use Peak Expiratory Flow measurements and ACT scores in your Asthma Action Plan to help guide you in responding to changes in your lungs.

 

In order for you to self-manage your asthma, you need a way to detect early drops in your lung function.

Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) is that way.

It is measured using a device held up to your lips while you forcefully exhale.

This device measures how much air is exhaled and registers this as a number for you to read from the device.

When your lungs are in good control, the number reading for your PEF will be very similar to that of a person without asthma.

When your inflammation gets out of control, the swelling in your breathing tubes blocks air from being exhaled.  This results in lower numbers on your PEF device.

When this device is used daily, you will be able to detect a downward trend that is a sign of worsening inflammation days before your breathing becomes so labored that an ER trip is needed.

Peak Expiratory Flow:  Let’s make it a daily measurement!

Complete the subscription form on the left if you’d like to get an email when I post a new podcast and blog entry.

If you need a Peak Flow Meter and your pharmacy or doctor can’t help, you can order from Amazon.  I have tested the Omron and found it durable, simple, compact, and affordable.

 

I may earn commissions for purchases made through the links below.

 

_____________________

 

PEF: Omron Peak Flow Meter

https://amzn.to/3lT9R9z

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

Why no one has a PEF device

There may be a number of reasons and the reason may be different between patients but one big problem in the U.S. is that doctors don’t order them for patient use, despite the national recommendation to do so.

What does it Mean?

Regular measurements of your PEF are not only of interest to you.

I will use your measurements to decide the strength for your controller medicine.

The goal with controller medicine is to find the lowest possible dose that controls your lung inflammation.

This strategy reduces problems that can occur when steroids are overused, such as  fungus infections in the mouth, slowed growth in children, and lessening your body’s ability to withstand the stress of injury or infection.

How do you get one?

I’ll give you a doctor’s order to present to the pharmacy, or if they don’t have it, I tell you where to order from Amazon.

Subscribe

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Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Asthma Action Plan:  Personalized Just For You!

Asthma Action Plan: Personalized Just For You!

Asthma Action Plan: Personalized Just For You!

* Your Asthma Action Plan is your quick-reference guide telling you how to react to changes in your breathing.

* Your plan uses your Peak Expiratory Flow readings and  ACT scores to determine if your asthma is in control.

* Your Asthma Action Plan clearly instructs you what to do when your symptoms flare up or your Peak Expiratory Flow is dropping.

* This allows you to take action with additional medication that I have ordered for you to stop your wheezing from becoming a full-blown asthma attack.

* Just to make sure you know your plan and where it is, I send it to your by text or email so you can keep it right on your phone!

 

In order for you to know how to respond to changes in your symptoms (ACT score) and lung performance (PEF), you need a plan.

I assemble this plan for you.

We call it an Asthma Action Plan.  It is based on:

your asthma severity,

…your history, and

…Your current medications.

An Asthma Action Plan has been part of the National recommendations since they were first published in 2003.

Yet, even today, most asthma patients do not get an Action Plan or don’t have ready access to one.

This is usually because it was printed on a piece of paper.

Seriously, who among us can keep track of any piece of paper?

If it’s important that you have it, and it is, then you need it at your fingertips.

That’s why the Asthma Action Plan from Asthmaniac gets sent

to your phone.

Yes, to your phone!

You need it at your fingertips to readily open and use as a guide for your symptoms.

Here’s the thing:  as your asthma doctor, I am not with you 24/7.  Yet, your symptoms can change rapidly.

You need to know how to respond.

This ability for you to take the correct action quickly is an essential part of quality asthma care.

Asthma Action Plan on your phone – a key advantage of Asthmaniac!

Complete the subscription form on the right if you’d like to get an email when I post a new podcast and blog entry.

Thanks for learning more about your asthma!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

Subscribe

to get Asthma Updates!

Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Asthma Control Test Score: How We Use It

Asthma Control Test Score: How We Use It

Asthma Control Test Score: How We Use It

* The Asthma Control Test (ACT) is a survey that you fill out about your breathing symptoms.

* Your score on this survey will classify your asthma into 3 levels: Well Controlled, Not Well Controlled, and Poorly Controlled

* These classifications are used to determine what medications should be on your Asthma Action Plan.

* The ACT should be completed weekly to make sure we have the earliest sign that your asthma is flaring up.

* You can complete the ACT with my little helper Freddy assisting at the:  Asthmaniac Asthma Control Test page.

Breathing.  It can be easy.  When your asthma is not controlled, it is not.

All illnesses cause changes in you how you feel. These sensations are called symptoms.

For asthma, these symptoms are things like:

  • shortness of breath,
  • coughing,
  • chest tightness, and
  • audible wheezing.

In a chronic illness like asthma your lungs are constantly reacting to outside forces.

Viruses and allergens, smoke, pets – all can trigger symptoms.

These symptoms can change on a daily basis.

In asthma, doctors have learned that worsening of lung function can be predicted by having patients assign a “score” to their symptoms.

This scoring should be done at regular intervals and compared to periods when you are well.

The scoring system that I use for asthma symptoms is called the Asthma Control Test (ACT).

This system uses a form that allows you to assign a number score for five categories of your symptoms.

I ask my patients to do this several times a week and I teach them how to recognize a developing problem in their lungs.

Regular symptom assessment is standard in asthma disease management.

That’s why it’s in your Asthmaniac method!

Complete the subscription form on the left if you’d like to get an email when I post a new podcast and blog entry.

Thanks for learning more about asthma!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

Subscribe

to get Asthma Updates!

Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Asthma Facts

Asthma Facts

Asthma Facts

What is Asthmaniac and why do you need it?  I’m Dr. Tim Ryschon and I have an asthma solution for you.

* Asthmaniac.com is my online asthma clinic 

* Asthmaniac is designed to be affordable, convenient, and reliable.

* Asthmaniac follows national quality standards developed at NIH

* Asthmaniac uses your phone to make your care convenient and engaging

 

What is Asthmaniac?

Asthmaniac is the name of my podcast which is also the name of my telemedicine clinic.

My clinic, Asthmaniac.com, is 100% online.  Using this online method,  I can deliver phone and video-based encounters that focus on just your asthma.

These visits are designed to achieve stabilization of your asthma so you can avoid asthma attacks  and enjoy worry-free breathing for an active life.

.My strategy depends on making you the expert of your asthma. 

This will allow you to react quickly to changes in your breathing.  

It will also equip you to tell me how your asthma action plan is working, since you will really understand it.

What Makes Asthmaniac Different from a Traditional Clinic?

  • A 100% focus on asthma control.
  • It is based on National Standards and the most modern methods of asthma control.
  • It uses 100% online phone and video visits.
  • Doctor visits are priced at $50 each and you can pay online – no insurance needed.
  • It uses 100% electronic medication prescriptions – sent direct to your pharmacy.
  • It uses proven online symptom assessment.
  • It tracks lung function by Peak Expiratory Flow.
  • It delivers follow-up visits to assure effective control.
  • It gives you a usable and continuously updated Asthma Action Plan.

Why focus on Asthma?

There are many health problems facing all of us.  I have spent 30 years learning about and treating them.  

A few of these disorders stand out as being controllable.

Asthma is one of those.  Asthma control has been the topic of extensive research which has led to the development of clearly defined treatment directions .

These guidelines for doctors to follow have been refined since first released in 1991 with updates in 2002 and 2007.

Despite these clear directions, asthma care remains poor in the U.S.

Asthmaniac is My Solution for this Problem.

  • Asthmaniac focuses only on asthma.  

That allows me to really drill into the most current techniques for asthma control, patient education, and how to deliver care.

  • Asthmaniac is built around the well-defined National Standards for Asthma Care. 

That means everything I recommend is state-of-the-art and based on evidence, science, and clinical practice.

  • Asthmaniac leverages smartphone and telemedicine methods

It is no longer acceptable to require you to come to a clinic when I can do everything that you and I need to accomplish by voice and video.  Delivering doctor visits by phone and video is way less expensive for me which allows me to reduce the cost of the doctor visit for you.

It’s also more convenient for you to get your doctor visit from wherever you are, right?

  • No Insurance Needed

Your ability to get great asthma care should not be gummed up by an insurance issue.  That’s why I keep the insurance companies out of our visits and keep the cost of the visit fair and reasonable for an out-of-pocket expense.

  • Electronic Prescriptions

It is kind of ridiculous in this electronic era that you’d have to take a paper prescription to the pharmacy for your medication.  In my system, these medication orders are transmitted electronically.  That keeps your care convenient and efficient and no paper to lose!

  • Online Symptom Assessment

Years of asthma research have produced convenient ways to track your asthma symptoms.  These surveys can be used to give an early sign that your asthma is out of control and vice versa, can be reassuring proof that your asthma action plan is working.  I have integrated one of these surveys, the Asthma Control Test (ACT) into my clinic and you can take it anytime on your phone, tablet or desktop computer at https://asthmaniac.com/asthma-control-test.  After you complete the test, your score is sent to you along with my recommendations. 

  • Peak Expiratory Flow

Knowing how your lungs are performing is really important in planning your medication and asthma action plan.  Listening to your lungs is not that helpful in showing small changes in your lung function.  Fortunately, research with pocket flow meters has shown that these devices are really useful in detecting early drops in function that tell me you need a different medication and a different asthma action plan.  I make sure all of my patients have a pocket meter and that they use it regularly.

  • Follow-up Care is an Essential Part of Asthmaniac

Asthma control has a lot of moving parts.  Inconsistent follow-up care:

  • Interrupts medication refills,
  • Blocks clinical reassessment, 
  • Prevents adjustments in medication dosage, and
  • Derails optimization of treatment plans.

Even if asthma patients were motivated to go into their doctor’s clinic for follow-up, with the COVID19 pandemic, they are discouraged to go for fear of catching the virus.  

Asthmaniac makes that follow-up visit as easy as a phone call but loaded with important information about your asthma.

  • Asthma Action Plan

I need to get you really involved in your asthma control.  The best way is to develop a plan that you understand and can follow.  This Asthma Action Plan is modified as your asthma changes which happens due to illness, seasons, or age.  We revisit this plan at every follow-up visit and then I send it to your phone where you can study it and refer to it when your symptoms change.

The basic problem that asthma patients have faced forever is still true today:  Uncontrolled asthma is dangerous!

But unlike the past, asthma can be controlled!

Asthmaniac is all about your asthma control.

Asthmaniac provides:

I have designed Astmaniac to help you MASTER your asthma!

Yes, there is a lot to learn about asthma.

In order to really understand and be in control of YOUR asthma, you need to know more about it.

Let me be your partner in getting in control.

Here’s where my three decades of experience come in handy.  I have selected the most important concepts that I know you need to understand for optimal self-management.

I post them at Asthmaniac.com in the section titled Asthmaniac Facts.

And since neither you or I stop learning, I add new sections frequently, bringing you the most expert guidance available.

You can read them in the blog section of Asthmaniac.com.

OR…better yet,

subscribe and receive a message each time I add a new blog or a new podcast!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

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Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Asthma Attack Triggers:  Keep a Lid On It!

Asthma Attack Triggers: Keep a Lid On It!

Asthma Attack Triggers: Keep a Lid On It!

Triggers for wheezing (bronchoconstriction) include:

* Pollen

* Dust Mites

* Cockroaches

* Mold

* Pet dander

* Tobacco Smoke

To prevent wheezing, you need to avoid these triggers.

If avoiding them isn’t possible, I can prescribe medicine suppresses the effect of triggers.

 

As you have learned, asthma symptoms occur when the breathing tubes or bronchi, clench down.  

We call this bronchoconstriction.

Bronchoconstriction blocks the flow of air to your lungs, creating labored breathing, shortness of breath, and chest pain..

In most patients with asthma, this bronchoconstriction is ‘triggered’ by something outside of your body.  

Quite often, this ‘something’ is a breathable, microscopic particle.  When these particles land in your airways, they launch an allergic reaction in your airways.

These particles are called allergens.

There are a number of natural and man-made allergens that can trigger wheezing and asthma attacks.

Pollen from trees and plants that you inhale is one of the most common and difficult to avoid when you are outside.

The most problematic indoor allergen is dust mites.  These microscopic white insects eat the dead skin cells we humans shed.  These skin cells build up in carpet, upholstery, and bedding and sure enough, that’s where the mites will be.

Bronchoconstriction is triggered when microscopic parts of mite skeletons and mite fecal droppings are inhaled. 

Cockroaches are another big problem for asthma patients.

Cockroach fecal droppings can be inhaled in the same way as dust mites, leading to bronchoconstriction.

Another indoor allergen is mold .  A mold grows, microscopic spores are released and can be inhaled.  In some patients with asthma, these spores can trigger wheezing.

Some of our favorite pet companions can trigger wheezing.  The hair fiber of dogs and cats is composed of microscopic flakes called dander.

Dander is a powerful allergen in some people. 

Fortunately for us and them, bathing dogs and cats weekly dramatically reduces how much dander they release.

It comes as no surprise that Tobacco smoke is a powerful trigger of bronchospasm.

With short-term inhalation, tobacco smoke irritates the lining of the bronchi causing bronchospasm.  

With repeated inhalation, permanent damage occurs to the lungs, leading to emphysema and lung failure.

Other irritants that can trigger bronchospasm include: wood smoke from wood stoves, heaters and fireplaces, and, 

strong chemical odors released from perfumes, solvents and paint.

 

My Strategy for Handling Triggers:

Every patient has a unique response to triggers.

Usually, the most powerful trigger can be identified by you through past experience .  

The most important thing you can do to limit these trigger effects is to avoid the source of the trigger.  

While this sounds simple, it can be difficult to achieve in daily life.  

There are specific strategies that I will recommend for trigger avoidance.

But, when avoiding the trigger is not possible, I will prescribe medicine designed to help your airways resist bronchospasm from inhaled triggers.

As you can see, controlling triggers is a really important part of keeping your asthma controlled.

But there’s even more to learn, so let’s dig in!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare 
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

 

 

Subscribe

to get Asthma Updates!

Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!

Phone Doctor Visits: They Work For Asthma Control!

Phone Doctor Visits: They Work For Asthma Control!

Phone Doctor Visits: They Work For Asthma Control!

*  Quality Asthma care depends on self-management by patients.

*  A large part of my role as your physician is teaching you these self-management skills.

*  Crucial to these skills are techniques you will use to assess:

*  Your Symptoms (Asthma Control Test)

*  Your Lung Function (Peak Expiratory Flow)

*  We will discuss your self-assessments by phone rather than in-person.

*  These phone visits and your frequent use of the Asthmaniac website are designed to keep your asthma controlled while avoiding illness exposure and the inconveience of travel and waiting rooms

 

I designed Asthmaniac around the National standards for asthma care.

Those standards tell doctors to teach their patients how to assess their everyday symptoms and lung lung capacity.

Years of research has led to the creation of a solid symptom assessment tool (Asthma Control Test or ACT).   This is a survey that you can complete yourself and then report to me.

Research has also shown that lung performance – or how well you are able to breath out (Peak Expiratory Flow or PEF), can be measured using a simple, pocket-sized flow meter.

In my Asthmaniac clinic, I ask that patients use a simple flowmeter to record their number several times each week.

I instruct you how to use this number in conjunction with your Action Plan.

I use this number in planning updates to your medications, their dosages, and your Action Plan.

The great thing about having these two proven methods of assessing your asthma is that we can conduct our entire asthma appointment over the phone.

Yes!

Over the phone!

That means you can get your Asthmaniac appointment on a lunch break, walking down the street, or wherever you are.

One place you won’t be is sitting?

A doctor office waiting room – waiting to catch a virus!

Phone appointments: a key convenience of Asthmaniac!

#asthmacontrolnow
#telemedicineasthmacare 
#backpocketasthmadoc
#asthmaactionplan
#asthmacontroltest
#asthmacontroller
#rescueinhaler
#asthmacovid19
#childrenandasthma
#eprescription
#easthma
#peakexpiratoryflow
#peakflowmeter
#asthmaniac

Subscribe

to get Asthma Updates!

Grow your asthma knowledge by getting these blog updates in your email!

Asthma Rescue Inhalers Are Crucial in Asthma Control!

* Rescue inhalers are essential * The albuterol in rescue inhalers opens breathing tubes quickly * If it doesn’t quickly improve your breathing, go to the ER * A spacer should be used with all liquid medicine inhalers * Generic albuterol is now available...

Do You Need an Asthma Controller Medication?

* Asthma controllers are medications that “control” the underlying inflammation in your breathing tubes. * Inhaled corticosteroids are the most common type of medicine used for this purpose. * In order for corticosteroids to work, they have to be inhaled...

What is an MDI Spacer and Why Do You Need One?

* A spacer is needed to hold your asthma medicine in a cloud until you can pull it into your lungs with a deep breath.

* If you don’t use a spacer with your asthma medicine, it ends up on tongue and on the walls of your throat where it can’t help your asthma and usually causes a yeast infection.

* Spacers should be used with all of your asthma medicine that comes in a metered dose inhaler (MDI).

* Medicine administered by a dry powder inhaler does not require a spacer since the design of the inhaler stirs and suspends the dry powder particles so they can be inhaled deeply.

Your Asthma Control Is Our Mission

 Same Day Appointments are Available.

720-900-0943

Telemedicine for You!